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In the neighbourhood: Enan Kaneenan

When considering collaborations for The Gospel, we always look to work with people and brands within our own community first and foremost. For Christmas this year, we teamed up with local brand Enan Kaneenan Ceramics as a celebration of the creative community within the Brunswick neighbourhood. Enan Kaneenan Ceramics is a small Brunswick based business with a focus on creativity, curiosity and joy. With no formal training, it was born out of pure passion and an obsession to understand and learn all aspects of ceramics as an artform. As part of our Ceramic Whiskey Cup Kit limited release, we chatted to the man behind the pottery wheel, Ceramicist and Founder Elliot James Stock, to uncover his obsession with ceramics and...

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History of Whisk(e)y in Australia

It is widely believed that whisky arrived in Australia with the Scottish and Irish settlers, who brought their love for spirits with them, but the first legal distillery wasn’t opened until 1822. Sorell Distillery (1822) in Hobart was the first of 16 distilleries that opened in Tasmania before state Governor John Franklin enacted the Prohibition Distillation Act, banning spirits production in 1839.[1][2] This was at the request of his wife Lady Jane who pleaded “I would prefer barley be fed to pigs than it be used to turn men into swine.”[3] Considering Tasmania’s current standing in the world of Australian whisky, incredibly, whisky production did not resume here again until 1992 when Bill Lark had the Distillation Act 1901, requiring...

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In the neighbourhood: Brunswick Soap House

At The Gospel, we recognise our responsibility to operate in a responsible manner and to be conscious of our environmental footprint. As a growing young business, we continue to learn and evolve, finding more sustainable and socially considered ways of doing things. Spent wash (also known as pot ale) is a by-product of whiskey production. Rye grain mash runs through our purpose-built column still, separating the alcohol from the grain, leaving behind a wash (traditionally a waste product). In line with our sustainability ethos, we give the wash to a local farmer for animal feed (it’s rich in protein), completely diverting it from waste. As part of our innovation program, we also considered other ways to upcycle the distilling by-product...

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Fanatics: Capturing the fading history of Inner Melbourne

Flicking through David Wadelton’s book Small Business, it’s easy to feel you are being drawn back to a previous time in history. An era when it was the norm for stores to have checkerboard lino on the floor, framed photos of the owners behind the counter, and sloping glass display cases showing the goods on offer. Yet the images in Small Business were all taken since 2010, mostly in inner city Melbourne, with a few from the wider Victoria region. Wadelton’s aim was to capture a style of family-owned retailing that is slowly disappearing with the arrival of fast food chain outlets, shopping malls, and big box stores. In fact, a third of the businesses shown in the book have...

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In the regions: Yumbo Soda Co from Yarra Valley

When I was younger, I fantasised about having a lemonade stand (I’d seen it in all the movies) but alas, the trampoline temptation was too strong of a pull, so I never got around to doing it. In a simpler time, before all the health crazes and education that now exists at our fingertips, my parents allowed us to sip on the sweet, bubbly nectar of our choice – my brother a Passiona guy and myself a Soloenthusiast. It was refreshing, thirst-quenching, and it tasted of summertime, swimming pools and carefree fun. My sweet tooth faded as I grew older but occasionally, when that Melbourne summer heat whips through town, I get that same nostalgic thirst I had from my...

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